Come for the plays, stay for the city

The Boston Globe

By BROOKE JACKSON-GLIDDEN

Ashland Artisans Market

When the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s artistic director Bill Rauch isn’t curating seasons of classic and original theater, he’s on the Rogue River with his family, rafting.

“There’s such a strong culture of outdoors: You can hike, you can raft in the summer, you can ski in the winter,” Rauch, a Harvard alum and seasoned director, said in a phone interview. “Ashland, even though it’s a small town of only 20,000 people, has the cultural amenities of much larger cities in terms of extraordinary restaurants, bed-and-breakfasts, galleries, and art house movie theaters. It’s part of the reason I fell in love: the best of a small town with a lot of the culture of a large city.”

Read the full report in The Boston Globe >

DANCIN Vineyards one of five Oregon wineries with eateries profiled by Palate

PalatePress_logo-01-e1439571428273
by MARY CRESSLER

dancinvineyards

Winemakers will often tell you that their wines are meant to be enjoyed with food. But how often does a winery have a chance to prove it to their guests? In the U.S. more wineries have begun incorporating food and wine pairings into their hospitality programs. However, few of them have gone beyond simple bites to build an actual sit-down restaurant on site.

In Oregon, strict land use laws have kept many owners from developing commercial kitchens. But things are changing and slowly wineries are developing full food programs to go alongside their wines.
In our continuing exploration of epicurean experiences at wineries, we are focusing on five Oregon producers that are shifting the paradigm. From southern Oregon all the way up to Portland, these wineries have gone beyond the typical cheese and charcuterie plate by offering a seat at their tables. Literally.

Offering a full spectrum food and wine experience to tasting room guests is certainly one way for a winery to stand out from the growing competition. But I discovered that standing out isn’t the reason these wineries decided to offer them.

“We never set out to be a restaurant,” explains Dan Marca of southern Oregon’s DANCIN Vineyards, “But I’m Italian. We are all about hospitality.”

Read the full report featuring DANCIN Vineyards on PalatePress.com