12 places to see fall color in Oregon

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by JAMIE HALE

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Oregon is known as an evergreen state, full of that iconic Douglas-fir and all its coniferous brethren. Evergreens are so prevalent here, that you should feel free to excuse yourself if seeing the fall colors isn't usually at the top of your autumn to-do list. While most abundant in urban areas, deciduous trees make up about 10 percent of Oregon's 30 million acres of forest, accordingto data from the U.S. Forest Service. That includes huge stands of oak and red alder, significant populations of maple and the coniferous western larch, and stray patches of aspen, ash and cottonwood. If you time a fall vacation for late-September to mid-October, and you know where to go (a few ideas are below), you can witness a spectacular showing of color bursting forth from our otherwise-evergreen forests. You can always settle for the sights of the cities – where fall color is as abundant as pumpkin-flavored lattes – but consider an adventure into Oregon's other autumnal settings: sprawling forests that offer more scenic diversity than you ever knew.

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Ease on down to Ashland for Oregon Shakespeare Festival's 'The Wiz'

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by LINCOLN KAY

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Lincoln Kaye is visiting Ashland Oregon, home to Southern Oregon University and the award-winning and internationally-known regional theatre company, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

The closest approximation of a homegrown, made in U.S.A.  uhr-myth has to beThe Wizard of Oz. The L. Frank Baum children’s classic – the saga of a Kansas pre-teen, tornado-tossed into a surreal dream world where she befriends talking beasts and mannequins, quells witches, frees slave-elves and debunks a phony godman – melds all the ingredients of an archetypal hero-quest. The story has given rise, over the past century, to a series of books, as well as multiple stage plays, musicals and films. In the 1970’s, at the trailing edge of a decade of Civil Rights Movement triumphs, the music-and-lyrics duo of Charlie Smalls and William F. Brown came out with an all-black version, The Wiz, which was then parlayed into a hit movie with an all-star Motown cast. But now the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) has revived The Wiz in what may be its unlikeliest incarnation yet: a full-dress masque in the grand 17th century tradition, as befits the Tudor splendour of Ashland’s outdoor Elizabethan Theatre.

Read the full report on VancouverObserver.com >